Bookish

Why We Love Books

That title is a lie. I can’t tell you why we love books. However, I can tell you why love books. Maybe some of my reasons for loving books will overlap with yours, and maybe not.

I wasn’t very fond of books until I was eleven years old, when I was introduced to The Tripods series by John Christopher. They were the first books that I wanted to read on my own, I really loved the story. After that I started picking up book after book, developing a love for the written word.

Books are a great – and cheap – way to explore this world, and others, without ever having to leave the comfort of your home. They provide a sense of comfort, finding stories that show you aren’t alone in they way you think, or what you’re going through. You can explore an endless amount of possibilities between the pages of a book.

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Book Reviews

Love Anthony by Lisa Genova

Love Anthony is a heartwarming story about two women on Nantucket. As Beth, a mother of three, struggles with finding out her husband has been cheating, she rediscovers her passion for writing. Olivia, grieving the death of her autistic son and going through a divorce, runs away to Nantucket. The two women help each other through their struggles.

Throughout the novel we get to read bits of Beth’s story, a story told in the voice of an autistic child who can’t talk.

Love Anthony is a heart-touching story, and a definite tear-jerker. This has quickly become one of my favourite books.

My Rating: 5/5

Book Recs

Book Recommendation: The Little Book of Hygge by Meik Wiking

I can’t remember exactly how I came across this book, but I’m glad I did. I have a fondness for anything that evokes feelings of coziness. The Little Book of Hygge is all about finding ways to incorporate hygge – which is a feeling of coziness but also way more than just that – into your life. This book features some gorgeous artwork and has a great way of explaining what hygge is to a non-Dane.

The Little Book of Hygge explains the Danish concept hygge, a term that can’t fully be translated into English but is similar to the feelings of coziness and homeliness 

Book Reviews

The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom

The Five People You Meet in Heaven is the story of Eddie’s death. Eddie is a maintenance man at an amusement park, and then he dies. In heaven Eddie meets five people who have a lesson to teach him about his life.

The Five People You Meet in Heaven is an easy and enjoyable read. Although the story isn’t very gripping there are a few parts that are quite interesting.

My Rating: 3/5

Bookish

13 Reasons Why: Tv Adaptation

I recently watched the tv adaptation of Jay Asher’s book 13 Reasons Why. I personally really enjoyed the show and thought it was extremely well done. The show can be very triggering for suicide, rape, depression, self-harm, and sexual assault; and should not be watched if anything of those things are triggering for you.

It’s been a few a years since I read the book, enough that I didn’t remember much about how the plot unfolds and I’m not fully sure what the differences between the book and show are. With that in mind, this post will focus only on the tv adaptation.

Before we go any farther, there will be spoilers included in this post.

I’ve heard people saying this show glorifies/romanticizes suicide. I disagree with that, the way I interpreted the show was as an honest and extremely raw portrayal of suicide and possible circumstances leading to the decision of suicide.

It shows how small things, that you may not even realise you’re doing, can have a profound effect on someone. Everyone does bad things sometimes, and instead of trying to deny it and hide from it, it’s better to admit it. Hold yourself accountable, apologize, and learn from your mistakes. It won’t make everything better, but it is a start to being better, to doing better.

Some people view the portrayal of Hannah’s suicide, and the tapes, as revenge to get back at the people who have hurt her. I didn’t see it that way. Hannah’s tapes are similar to when you’re upset with someone so you write a letter to them that you have no intention of actually sending, except she did send them. Maybe she did want to hurt them, or maybe her goal was to inspire change. She made 12 tapes and in doing so ended up feeling well enough that she wanted to give life a second chance, to get help.

The show also displays that getting help isn’t always as easy as people think. Hannah tries to reach out for help, but it doesn’t go very well. Mr. Porter even plays into rape culture, trying to discredit what Hannah was saying before even hearing the full story. He’s a horrible counsellor all around.

I think the point of this adaptation was to show the honest, raw, and extremely uncomfortable side of bullying, suicide, and the ignorance of adults. The only unrealistic aspect of this show is how many tattoos these teenagers have.

This is only my opinion and my experience with the show. You may very well disagree with me, favouring the opinions I’m disagreeing with.

Book Reviews

The Witch’s Daughter by Paula Brackston

The Witch’s Daughter is about a woman who becomes a witch. Bess spends her life on the run from the warlock who turned her into a witch. In modern day Bess meets a teenaged girl whom she befriends and begins teaching her the craft.

The story jumps between modern day and various points in Bess’s past.

I found the story to be slow, with very little mention of magic until about the last fifty pages.

Bess doesn’t seem like a very realistic character, she’s quite naive for someone who’s been alive for around 400 years. I didn’t find any of the characters particularly likeable, they had a lot of flaws with almost no growth throughout the book.

Overall, the story was very different from how I originally thought it would be. I believe that is partially why I didn’t enjoy this novel.

My Rating: 2/5

Bookish, Top 7

Top 7 Poems

If you’ve read last Tuesday’s post then you know it’s currently National Poetry Month. To continue on that note, for this month’s top seven I’m sharing seven of my favourite poems.

 

 

Sonnet 14

If thou must love me, let it be for nought

Except for love’s sake only. Do not say

‘I love her for her smile . . . her look . . . her way

Of speaking gently, . . . for a trick of thought

That falls in well with mine, and certes brought

A sense of pleasant ease on such a day’ –

For these things in themselves, Beloved, may

Be changed, or change for thee – and love, so wrought,

May be unwrought so. Neither love me for

Thine own dear pity’s wiping my cheeks dry –

A creature might forget to weep, who bore

Thy comfort long, and lose thy love thereby!

But love me for love’s sake, that evermore

Thou mayst love on, through love’s eternity.

~Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Wallflower

Shrinking in a corner,

pressed into the wall;

do they know I’m present,

am I here at all?

 

Is there a written rule book,

that tells you how to be –

all the right things to talk about –

that everyone has but me?

 

Slowly I am withering –

a flower deprived of sun;

longing to belong to –

somewhere or someone.

~ Lang Leav

 

you tell me

I am not like most girls

and learn to kiss me with your eyes closed

something about the phrase – something about

how I have to be unlike the women

I call sisters in order to be wanted

makes me want to spit your tongue out

like I am supposed to be proud you picked me

as if I should be relieved you think

I am better than them

~ Rupi Kaur

 

Longing

I envy seas whereon he rides,

I envy spokes of wheels

Of chariots that him convey,

I envy speechless hills

That gaze upon his journey;

How easy all can see

What is forbidden utterly

A heavens, unto me!

I envy nests of sparrows

That dot his distant eaves,

The wealthy fly upon his pane,

The happy, happy leaves

That just abroad his window

Have summer’s leaves to be,

The earrings of Pizarro

Could not obtain for me.

I envy light that wakes him,

And bells the boldly ring

To tell him it is noon abroad –

Myself his noon could bring,

Yet interdict my blossom

And abrogate my bee,

Lest noon in everlasting night

Drop Gabriel and me.

~ Emily Dickinson

 

Ebb and Flow

She yearns to learn

how his tide is turned,

to understand

each grain of sand,

he knows.

 

To move in rhythm,

with his ebb and flow.

~ Lang Leav

 

my issue with what they consider beautiful

is their concept of beauty

centers around excluding people

I find hair beautiful

when a woman wears it

like a garden on her skin

that is the definition of beauty

big hooked noses

pointing upward to the sky

like they’re rising

to the occasion

skin the color of earth

my ancestors planted crops on

to feed a lineage of women with

thighs think as tree trunks

eyes like almonds

deeply hooded with convictions

the rivers of punjab

flow through my bloodstream so

don’t tell me my women

aren’t as beautiful

as the ones in

your country

~ Rupi Kaur

 

A Drinking Song

Wine comes in at the mouth

And love comes in at the eye;

That’s all we shall know for truth

Before we grow old and die.

I lift the glass to my mouth,

I look at you, and I sigh.

W.B. Yeats

 

Book Reviews

All the Rage by Courtney Summers

All the Rage is about a girl named Romy who was raped by the Sheriff’s son. Everyone in Romy’s little town decides to believe she is lying. When a girl with ties to both Romy and the boy who raped her goes missing, things get worse for Romy. 

This story wasn’t what I initially expected, however, it is a great book. Romy is an interesting and complex character. I enjoyed trying to dissect her feelings and attempting to truly understand her.

All the Rage is a tragic story that’s beautifully written.

My Rating: 3/5

Bookish

Poetry Month

April is National Poetry Month. National Poetry Month began in the 90’s as a way to help increase knowledge and appreciation of poetry.

Poetry comes in many different forms and styles, and has a long history. You can read this article for a brief overview of poetry’s history.

I’ve never been a huge poetry fan, however, I’ve recently found myself wanting to read more poetry and trying to understand it better. I find that I like modern poetry the best. It is the easiest to understand and relate to – quite possible because of the way language evolves with time.

Book Recs

Book Recommendation: Chai Tea Sunday by Heather A. Clark

What initially drew me to this book was that it has tea in the title, then after reading the synopsis on the back cover I decided to give it a try. I was not disappointed. Chai Tea Sunday is an emotional and atmospheric story. At first I wasn’t sure if I’d like the book, but I’m glad I gave it a chance. Chai Tea Sunday is an amazing story, I highly recommend giving it a read.

A couple other things that make this book so great are that it’s written by a Canadian woman, and it’s based on a true story.

After a complex tragedy leads to the end of her marriage Nicky travels to Kenya to volunteer at an orphanage. Living among the violence and poverty Nicky hope and is able to start healing with the help of her host mother.